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» Alzheimer's Disease and ecology

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image: This Bug Sucks

This Bug Sucks

By | September 1, 2014

An assassin bug, which some researchers are using as living syringes to sample blood from birds and mammals, feeds on a bat.

2 Comments

image: Splitting Hairs

Splitting Hairs

By | September 1, 2014

Fragments of mitochondrial DNA from deer hair found on the clothing of an ice-entombed mummy offer a glimpse into Copper Age ecology.

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image: Beyond the Blueprint

Beyond the Blueprint

By , and | September 1, 2014

In addition to serving as a set of instructions to build an individual, the genome can influence neighboring organisms and, potentially, entire ecosystems.

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image: Subglacial Ecosystem

Subglacial Ecosystem

By | August 22, 2014

Samples from an Antarctic lake 800 meters below the ice reveal an abundance of microbial life.

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image: Methylation Tied to Alzheimer’s

Methylation Tied to Alzheimer’s

By | August 20, 2014

People with the neurodegenerative disease are more likely to have certain epigenetic patterns than those without.

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image: Aged Wisdom

Aged Wisdom

By | August 1, 2014

Supercentenarian Hendrikje van Andel-Schipper appeared on CNN in 2009, before donating her body to science and yielding insights into her remarkable longevity.

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image: In Old Blood

In Old Blood

By | August 1, 2014

The body of a supercentenarian expands science’s appreciation for the physiological limits of aging.

3 Comments

image: Meal Plans

Meal Plans

By | August 1, 2014

Bacterial populations’ differing strategies for responding to their environment can set genetic routes to speciation.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: July 21–25

Week in Review: July 21–25

By | July 25, 2014

Blood-based Alzheimer’s diagnostics; CRISPR cuts out HIV; Leishmania and the sand fly microbiome; deconstructing the lionfish science fair debacle

0 Comments

image: Super Sniffers?

Super Sniffers?

By | July 24, 2014

African elephants have more genes for olfactory receptors than dogs or humans, a study shows. 

1 Comment

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