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image: Exploring the Inner Universe

Exploring the Inner Universe

By | November 6, 2015

A new American Museum of Natural History exhibit introduces visitors to the microbes within their bodies. 

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2015

The Psychology of Overeating, The Hidden Half of Nature, The Death of Cancer, and The Secret of Our Success

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image: Microbesity

Microbesity

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity appears linked to the gut microbiome. How and why is still a mystery—but scientists have plenty of ideas.

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image: Imaging Live Tissue Without Fluorescence

Imaging Live Tissue Without Fluorescence

By | October 30, 2015

Modifying a vibration-based optical technique can capture images of living tissues, researchers show. 

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image: Comprehensive Microbiome Initiatives Proposed

Comprehensive Microbiome Initiatives Proposed

By | October 29, 2015

To unify disparate research groups, scientists call for a new approach to studying the Earth’s microbiome.

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image: Imaging Entire Organisms

Imaging Entire Organisms

By | October 26, 2015

A new microscope allows researchers to watch biological processes at the cellular level in 3-D in living animals. 

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image: Microbiome Meals

Microbiome Meals

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers identify a handful of genes that help bacteria in the mouse gut adapt to dietary changes.

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image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.

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image: Cultural Riches

Cultural Riches

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers devise new techniques to facilitate growing bacteria collected from the environment.

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image: The First Neuron Drawings, 1870s

The First Neuron Drawings, 1870s

By | October 1, 2015

Camillo Golgi’s black reaction revealed, for the first time, the fine structures of intact neurons, which he captured with ink and paper.

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