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image: Gregory Sonnenberg: Cellular Spy

Gregory Sonnenberg: Cellular Spy

By | May 1, 2013

Research Associate, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. Age: 27

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image: Suited to a T

Suited to a T

By | May 1, 2013

Sorting out T-cell functional and phenotypic heterogeneity depends on studying single cells.

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image: Viruses on the Brain

Viruses on the Brain

By | May 1, 2013

Viral infections of the central nervous system may trigger cytokines that induce seizures.


image: Why So Soon?

Why So Soon?

By | May 1, 2013

Researchers are using modern experimental tools to probe the mysterious molecular pathways that lead to premature labor and birth.


image: Atomic Force Microscopy

Atomic Force Microscopy

By | April 2, 2013

The new technique reveals unprecedented details of microscopic life.


image: Mimicking Mussels

Mimicking Mussels

By | April 1, 2013

Scientists develop a gel that mimics mollusc glue to coat the insides of blood vessels.

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image: Start It Up

Start It Up

By | April 1, 2013

Young researchers who left the academic path to transform their bright ideas into thriving companies discuss their experiences, and how you can launch your own business.

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image: Structure by Feel

Structure by Feel

By | April 1, 2013

Applying the sensitive touch of atomic force microscopy to DNA, cells, and proteins

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image: Antibody-Dependent Enhanced (ADE) Immunity

Antibody-Dependent Enhanced (ADE) Immunity

By | March 2, 2013

The method to the dengue virus's maddening infectiousness.


image: Bedeviled by Dengue

Bedeviled by Dengue

By | March 1, 2013

The global spread of dengue virus has immunologists and public-health experts debating the best way to curb infection.


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