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image: Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

By | March 23, 2017

Murine neural tubes, with each image highlighting a different embryonic tissue type (blue). The neural tube itself (left) grows into the brain, spine, and nerves, while the mesoderm (middle) develops into other organs, and the ectoderm (right) forms skin, teeth, and hair.

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Mitochondrial DNA polymerase is necessary for the destruction of paternal mtDNA in fruit fly sperm, scientists show.

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The new technology could allow for new and improved applications in both medicine and research.  

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Proteins with unstable 3-D structures help the microscopic animals withstand drying.

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image: Image of the Day: Colorful Chromosomes

Image of the Day: Colorful Chromosomes

By | March 16, 2017

This 3-D model of the mouse genome depicts the interactions between chromosomes within an embryonic stem cell.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | March 16, 2017

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: House Bill Could Help Employers Dodge GINA

House Bill Could Help Employers Dodge GINA

By | March 13, 2017

HR 1313 could circumvent protections offered by the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act, enabling employers to incentivize employee sharing of genetic and other medical information.

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image: Opinion: Birds of a Feather?

Opinion: Birds of a Feather?

By | March 10, 2017

Taking into account the interaction of nuclear and mitochondrial genes in birds holds the promise of more objectively defining what constitutes a species.

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image: Five More Synthetic Yeast Chromosomes Completed

Five More Synthetic Yeast Chromosomes Completed

By | March 9, 2017

Members of the Synthetic Yeast Genome Project have synthesized five additional yeast chromosomes from scratch. 

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Researchers report growing a mouse embryo using two types of early stem cells.

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