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» imaging and developmental biology

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image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

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image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

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image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

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image: Brains in Action

Brains in Action

By | November 1, 2014

An inspiring lecturer turned Marcus Raichle’s focus from music and history to science. Since then, he has pioneered the use of imaging to study how our brains function.

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image: Rise, Mickey

Rise, Mickey

By | November 1, 2014

Scientist to Watch, Takaki Komiyama, discusses his use of chronic two-photon calcium imaging to explore how wakefulness and experience shape odor representations in the mouse olfactory bulb.

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image: A Conversation with a Laureate

A Conversation with a Laureate

By | October 13, 2014

The Scientist speaks with W.E. Moerner, who last week shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work on super-resolution molecular imaging.

1 Comment

image: Shrimp-Inspired Cancer Camera

Shrimp-Inspired Cancer Camera

By | October 6, 2014

Researchers have developed a tumor imaging device based upon the visual system of a crustacean.

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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Visualizing the Vibe

Visualizing the Vibe

By | October 1, 2014

Retrieving sound from video recordings of inanimate objects can have surprising applications.

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

3 Comments

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