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image: Research Behind Bars

Research Behind Bars

By | July 1, 2013

Ecologist Nalini Nadkarni advances forest conservation and science advocacy by enlisting the help of prisoners.

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image: Science on Lockdown

Science on Lockdown

By | July 1, 2013

A forest ecologist comes down from the canopy to bring science to the masses, forming a series of improbable collaborations with prisoners.

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image: Sea Bugs

Sea Bugs

By | July 1, 2013

Ocean viruses can impact marine ecosystems in several ways.

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image: An Ocean of Viruses

An Ocean of Viruses

By | July 1, 2013

Viruses abound in the world’s oceans, yet researchers are only beginning to understand how they affect life and chemistry from the water’s surface to the sea floor.

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image: The Art of Science

The Art of Science

By | June 21, 2013

Princeton scientists and engineers create a stunning collection of scientific images better suited for a gallery than a lab meeting.

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image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity

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image: Father of Crystallography Dies

Father of Crystallography Dies

By | June 17, 2013

Nobel Laureate Jerome Karle has passed away at age 94.

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image: Nailing Regeneration

Nailing Regeneration

By | June 12, 2013

Researchers identify the signaling program that enables finger and toenail stem cells to direct digit regeneration after amputation.

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image: Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

By | June 7, 2013

In avian species, a gene induces programmed cell death during development in the area where a phallus would otherwise grow.

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image: Snapshots of Shifting Bonds

Snapshots of Shifting Bonds

By | June 3, 2013

Researchers use atomic force microscopy to produce stunning images of a molecule reconfiguring its atomic bonds.  

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