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image: Top 10 Innovations 2016

Top 10 Innovations 2016

By | December 1, 2016

This year’s list of winners celebrates both large leaps and small (but important) steps in life science technology.

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A noninvasive microscopy technique that exploits NADH fluorescence enables researchers to observe how mitochondria alter their shape and arrangement in human tissue.

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image: Scientists Fingerprint the Brain

Scientists Fingerprint the Brain

By | November 17, 2016

The brain’s structural connections are unique to an individual, a new imaging technique reveals.

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image: Influential Organic Chemist Dies

Influential Organic Chemist Dies

By | November 7, 2016

John Roberts, the MIT and Caltech researcher who pioneered nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a tool to elucidate molecular structure, has passed away.

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image: Electron Micrographs Get a Dash of Color

Electron Micrographs Get a Dash of Color

By | November 3, 2016

A new technique creates colorful stains that label proteins and cellular structures at higher resolution than ever before possible. 

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image: Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

By | November 1, 2016

How to make the most of this rapidly developing technique and a look at what's on the horizon

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image: Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

By | November 1, 2016

No longer considered an inevitability, growing older should be and is being treated like a chronic condition. 

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image: Two-Photon Microscopy’s Historic Influence on Neuroscience

Two-Photon Microscopy’s Historic Influence on Neuroscience

By | November 1, 2016

In the 1990s, the development of this gentler and more precise microscopy method improved scientists’ ability to probe neurons’ activity and anatomy.

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image: Bridging a Gap in the Brain

Bridging a Gap in the Brain

By | October 12, 2016

Neuroscientists identify how the left and right hemispheres of the mammalian brain connect during development.

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image: Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

By | October 12, 2016

Viruses are responsible for the majority of archaea deaths on the deep ocean floors, scientists show.

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