The Scientist

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image: Rise, Mickey

Rise, Mickey

By | November 1, 2014

Scientist to Watch, Takaki Komiyama, discusses his use of chronic two-photon calcium imaging to explore how wakefulness and experience shape odor representations in the mouse olfactory bulb.

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image: Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

By | October 20, 2014

Several toad, newt, and salamander populations are being hit hard by an emerging pathogen in a pristine national park in Spain.

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image: A Conversation with a Laureate

A Conversation with a Laureate

By | October 13, 2014

The Scientist speaks with W.E. Moerner, who last week shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work on super-resolution molecular imaging.

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image: Shrimp-Inspired Cancer Camera

Shrimp-Inspired Cancer Camera

By | October 6, 2014

Researchers have developed a tumor imaging device based upon the visual system of a crustacean.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Visualizing the Vibe

Visualizing the Vibe

By | October 1, 2014

Retrieving sound from video recordings of inanimate objects can have surprising applications.

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image: Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

By | September 11, 2014

Farms support less phylogenetically diverse bird populations than forests, but some farms are better than others.

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image: Six-Legged Syringes

Six-Legged Syringes

By | September 1, 2014

Researchers whose work requires that they draw blood from wild animals are finding unlikely collaborators in biting insects.

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image: The Iceman Cometh

The Iceman Cometh

By | September 1, 2014

Meet Ötzi, the Copper Age ice man who is helping scientists reconstruct changes in the population genetics of the red deer he hunted.

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image: This Bug Sucks

This Bug Sucks

By | September 1, 2014

An assassin bug, which some researchers are using as living syringes to sample blood from birds and mammals, feeds on a bat.

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