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» imaging and evolution

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image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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image: Ancient Mammalian Fossil Found

Ancient Mammalian Fossil Found

By | August 16, 2013

The chipmunk-sized Rugosodon eurasiaticus is the oldest representative of a prolific and long-lasting mammalian lineage.

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image: Psychedelic Phylogenetics

Psychedelic Phylogenetics

By | August 9, 2013

Using molecular markers, researchers reconstruct the “magic” mushroom family tree. 

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image: Fossils Snarl Mammalian Roots

Fossils Snarl Mammalian Roots

By | August 7, 2013

Two newly discovered Jurassic-era fossils suggest drastically different mammalian origins.

2 Comments

image: Male Lineage Not Younger Than Females

Male Lineage Not Younger Than Females

By | August 2, 2013

Two genomic studies place the divergence of men from their most recent common ancestor nearer in time to that of women, though the field is far from a consensus.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews: Summer Fiction

Capsule Reviews: Summer Fiction

By | August 1, 2013

Crescent, An Empty Land of Plenty, Prophet of Bones, and Equilateral

1 Comment

image: Contributors

Contributors

By , and | August 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Finding the Way

Finding the Way

By | August 1, 2013

A focus on the movements of species and disciplines through space, time, and minds

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image: The Eye of the Finch

The Eye of the Finch

By | August 1, 2013

Beaks did it for Darwin. Now, monitoring real-time evolution of bacteria that infects finch eyes reveals repeated, rapid evolution of an emerging avian pathogen in backyards throughout the U.S.

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image: The Roots of Monogamy

The Roots of Monogamy

By | July 31, 2013

A new analysis suggests that infanticide drove the evolution of pair living in some primate species, though another study reaches a different conclusion.

4 Comments

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