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image: The King of Turtles

The King of Turtles

By | May 1, 2013

American naturalist Louis Agassiz had a zeal for collecting that encouraged a nation to engage with nature.

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image: Virus Latency Causes Cattle Disease?

Virus Latency Causes Cattle Disease?

By | April 29, 2013

Researchers identify a herpesvirus gene persisting in the cells of calves suffering from malignant catarrhal disease.

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image: Humans Under Pressure

Humans Under Pressure

By | April 25, 2013

Better health care in Gambian villages lead to flip-flopping selection pressures on height and weight.

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image: Naturalist’s House for Sale

Naturalist’s House for Sale

By | April 22, 2013

One of the surviving UK homes of pioneering but long-overlooked evolutionary theorist Alfred Russel Wallace is on the market.

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image: Tumors Fall to Radioactive Bacteria

Tumors Fall to Radioactive Bacteria

By | April 22, 2013

Researchers use bacteria to deliver radiation to shrink pancreatic tumors in mice.

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image: Did Inbreeding Royals Evolve?

Did Inbreeding Royals Evolve?

By | April 22, 2013

A new study suggests that in the Spanish Habsburg royal family, natural selection may have diminished the most harmful effects of inbreeding.

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image: Beer Tastes Intoxicating

Beer Tastes Intoxicating

By | April 15, 2013

Just the flavor of beer is enough to boost dopamine in brain areas related to reward—especially in men with alcoholic relatives.

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image: Plant DNA Largely Unchanged

Plant DNA Largely Unchanged

By | April 15, 2013

Today’s tulip trees carry similar mitochondrial DNA as those that grew in the time of the dinosaurs.

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image: Human Ancestors?

Human Ancestors?

By | April 11, 2013

Fossilized skeletal remains of the hominid Australopithecus sediba add to the puzzle of human evolution.

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image: “Breathprints” Could Diagnose Disease

“Breathprints” Could Diagnose Disease

By | April 5, 2013

Researchers can identify individuals by the unique chemical signatures in their breath, suggesting that exhalations could be used for metabolomic tests.

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