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image: How Tigers Get Their Stripes

How Tigers Get Their Stripes

By | February 22, 2012

For the first time researchers have demonstrated the molecular tango that gives rise to repeating patterns in developing animal embryos.

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image: Wireless Drug Chip

Wireless Drug Chip

By | February 20, 2012

The world’s first programmable drug-delivery chip passes the test, accurately and safely delivering an osteoporosis drug.

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image: Cell Change Up

Cell Change Up

By | February 9, 2012

Imaging cell cytoskeletons during early embryonic development leads researchers to uncover a new regulator of cell shape

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image: A Bill to Expedite Drug Production

A Bill to Expedite Drug Production

By | February 2, 2012

Legislation proposes speeding certain drug applications submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration.

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image: Reading Tea Leaves

Reading Tea Leaves

By | February 1, 2012

Cyclic peptides, discovered in an African tea used to speed labor and delivery, may hold potential as drug-stabilizing scaffolds, antibiotics, and anticancer drugs.

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image: Opinion: Celebrities Pushing Drugs?

Opinion: Celebrities Pushing Drugs?

By | January 30, 2012

Celebrity spokespeople for pharma companies can manipulate the public’s understanding of disease.

30 Comments

image: Anti-doping Lab Set for Olympics

Anti-doping Lab Set for Olympics

By | January 19, 2012

The most high-tech laboratory in the history of the Olympic Games is prepared to begin athlete testing in London.

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image: Ever Wonder…

Ever Wonder…

By | January 10, 2012

How does catnip work?

3 Comments

image: Drug Approvals Up for 2011

Drug Approvals Up for 2011

By | January 9, 2012

The FDA approved 30 drugs last year, the highest number in the last 7 years.

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image: Iron Builds a Better Brain

Iron Builds a Better Brain

By | January 9, 2012

Brain imaging and gene analyses in twins reveal that white matter integrity is linked to an iron homeostasis gene.

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