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image: Heart Strings

Heart Strings

By | May 1, 2015

An animated primer on the harvesting, growth, and administration of cardiac cells to heart attack patients

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image: Hearts on Trial

Hearts on Trial

By | May 1, 2015

As researchers conduct the most rigorous human trials of cardiac cell therapies yet attempted, a clear picture of whether these treatments actually work is imminent.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By , and | May 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2014 issue of The Scientist

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image: Researchers Regrow Mouse Thymus

Researchers Regrow Mouse Thymus

By | April 9, 2014

A simple genetic formula coaxes a shrunken mouse thymus to regenerate.  

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image: Skin-to-Liver Cell Shortcut

Skin-to-Liver Cell Shortcut

By | February 23, 2014

Researchers use an adapted reprogramming technique to generate hepatocytes for the repopulation of an injured mouse liver.

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image: Opinion: I Want My Kidney

Opinion: I Want My Kidney

By | November 7, 2013

With the advent of xenotransplantation, tissues made from cell-seeded scaffolds, and 3-D-printing, custom-made organs must be right around the corner.

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image: Toddler Gets Synthetic Windpipe

Toddler Gets Synthetic Windpipe

By | May 1, 2013

Doctors culture a custom-made trachea from plastic fibers and human cells, and successfully implant it into a child who was born without the organ.

2 Comments

image: The Organist

The Organist

By | May 1, 2013

When molecular biology methods failed her, Sangeeta Bhatia turned to engineering and microfabrication to build a liver from scratch.

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