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image: Similar Data, Different Conclusions

Similar Data, Different Conclusions

By | February 23, 2016

By tweaking certain conditions of a long-running experiment on E. coli, scientists found that some bacteria could be prompted to express a mutant phenotype sooner, without the “generation of new genetic information.” The resulting debate—whether the data support evolutionary theory—is more about semantics than science.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | February 22, 2016

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Detecting Lyme Early

Detecting Lyme Early

By | February 12, 2016

Two new methods could help researchers to diagnose Lyme disease earlier than with existing tests.

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image: Another Lyme Disease–Causing Bacterium Found

Another Lyme Disease–Causing Bacterium Found

By | February 9, 2016

Scientists discover another species of Borrelia in the U.S.

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image: Chat With Charlie

Chat With Charlie

By | February 1, 2016

See a preview of the app that lets you ask questions of a virtual Charles Darwin.

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image: Fighting Back

Fighting Back

By | February 1, 2016

Plants can’t run away from attackers, so they’ve evolved unique immune defenses to protect themselves.

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image: iDarwin

iDarwin

By | February 1, 2016

A synthetic interview with the father of evolutionary theory, now available as a smartphone app, teaches students and the public about the famed biologist.

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image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37

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image: Lizard Secretes Heat

Lizard Secretes Heat

By | January 25, 2016

Researchers confirm the unprecedented endothermic abilities of a South American reptile.

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image: How Multicellularity Arose

How Multicellularity Arose

By | January 11, 2016

Researchers identify a molecule that may have been key to the surprisingly common transition from single-celled ancestors to today’s complex, multicellular organisms. 

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