The Scientist

» approvals and culture

Most Recent

image: AAUP Champion Dies

AAUP Champion Dies

By | January 26, 2016

Jordan Kurland, associate general secretary of the American Association of University Professors, has passed away at age 87. 

0 Comments

image: Planning for the Next Ebola Outbreak

Planning for the Next Ebola Outbreak

By | January 20, 2016

A public-health nonprofit and an international drugmaker team up to stockpile hundreds of thousands of doses of a promising vaccine and to speed along the approval process.

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2016

January 2016's selection of notable quotes

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science 2015

Speaking of Science 2015

By | December 31, 2015

A year’s worth of noteworthy quotes

0 Comments

image: Drug Produced in GM Chicken Approved

Drug Produced in GM Chicken Approved

By | December 10, 2015

The US Food and Drug Administration greenlights a rare-disease drug that is produced in the eggs of genetically modified chickens.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2015

Welcome to the Microbiome, The Paradox of Evolution, Newton's Apple, and Dawn of the Neuron.

0 Comments

image: Self Correction

Self Correction

By | December 1, 2015

What to do when you realize your publication is fatally flawed

0 Comments

image: Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

By | November 24, 2015

One large provider says the shortfall should clear up by early 2016.

1 Comment

image: Clinical Trial Data Underreported: Study

Clinical Trial Data Underreported: Study

By | November 16, 2015

One-third of the human experiments for approved drugs failed transparency requirements.

0 Comments

image: Following the Funding

Following the Funding

By | November 4, 2015

Researchers use network theory to estimate the importance of relationships among researchers and institutions in attracting grant money.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Immune Cells Deliver Cancer Drugs to the Brain
AAAS