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image: Image of the Day: Hippocampal Jalapeno

Image of the Day: Hippocampal Jalapeno

By | August 30, 2017

To tease apart brain regions involved in forming versus remembering memories, scientists engineered mice whose brain cells could be manipulated and tagged.

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image: Retrieving Short-Term Memories

Retrieving Short-Term Memories

By | December 1, 2016

Neurons can continue to capture a short-term memory without continuous firing, researchers show.  

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image: Neuroscience of Early-Life Learning in <em>C. elegans</em>

Neuroscience of Early-Life Learning in C. elegans

By | February 11, 2016

Scientists identify the brain circuits with which newly hatched nematodes form and retrieve a lifelong aversive olfactory memory.

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image: Fixing Fearful Memories

Fixing Fearful Memories

By | January 20, 2014

Remote memories can be modified in the presence of a drug that induces epigenetic changes to DNA.

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image: Blocking Memories to Treat Alcoholism

Blocking Memories to Treat Alcoholism

By | June 25, 2013

Targeting a molecular pathway involved with learning and memory helps rats with a taste for booze wean themselves off of the sauce.

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image: Watching the Brain Remember

Watching the Brain Remember

By | May 16, 2013

For the first time, researchers visualize zebrafish memory retrieval in real time.

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