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» sequester and immunology

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image: Adding Insult to Injury

Adding Insult to Injury

By | November 11, 2013

The US government shutdown further hampered a research enterprise already struggling because of the sequester.

1 Comment

image: Time for T cells

Time for T cells

By | November 7, 2013

Circadian rhythms control the development of inflammatory T cells, while jet lag sends their production into overdrive.

1 Comment

image: Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

By | November 6, 2013

Cells that temporarily restrain their immune systems give babies’ gut bacteria a chance to settle down. 

1 Comment

image: Frisky Fruit Flies

Frisky Fruit Flies

By | November 5, 2013

Researchers show that Drosophila females upregulate an immune gene for protection against sexually transmitted infections before copulation.

1 Comment

image: It’s in the Genes

It’s in the Genes

By | October 24, 2013

Researchers find strong correlations between the composition of the human microbiome and genetic variation in immune-related pathways.

4 Comments

image: Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

By | October 20, 2013

An immune suppressive drug can unexpectedly help immunized mice fight off many strains of flu.

0 Comments

image: Sequester Hitting Scientists Hard

Sequester Hitting Scientists Hard

By | September 4, 2013

A recent survey of working researchers highlights funding difficulties and the perceived decline of the U.S. as a leader in science. 

1 Comment

image: Week in Review, July 8–12

Week in Review, July 8–12

By | July 12, 2013

Editor accused of fraud leaves post; the good and the bad of gut microbiota; bacterial gene shuffle; legal restrictions hamper illicit drug research; antibodies and autism

0 Comments

image: Good Budget News for Govt. Science

Good Budget News for Govt. Science

By | July 11, 2013

Congress subcommittees have proposed increased funding for NIH and NSF.

1 Comment

image: Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

By | July 1, 2013

Paul Ehrlich came up with an explanation for cellular interactions based on receptors, earning a Nobel Prize and the title "Father of Modern Immunology"—only to have his theory forgotten.

3 Comments

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