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» sequester and developmental biology

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image: Fish of Many Colors

Fish of Many Colors

By | January 23, 2014

Researchers seek insight into the pigmentation patterns of guppies and zebrafish.

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image: New Budget Bill Short Shrifts Science

New Budget Bill Short Shrifts Science

By | January 15, 2014

The omnibus spending bill unveiled by US Congress this week would restore some research budgets cut by sequestration, but critics say it's not enough.

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image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue

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image: Science Setbacks: 2013

Science Setbacks: 2013

By | December 24, 2013

Attracting research funds is never a simple proposition even in the best of years, but in 2013, life scientists dealt with some unique impediments to getting federal grants.

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image: New Budget Deal to Ease Sequester

New Budget Deal to Ease Sequester

By | December 11, 2013

US science may get temporary respite from across-the-board funding cuts that have been squeezing research budgets for more than 10 months.

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Speaking of Science

By | December 1, 2013

December 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: Adding Insult to Injury

Adding Insult to Injury

By | November 11, 2013

The US government shutdown further hampered a research enterprise already struggling because of the sequester.

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image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: Sequester Hitting Scientists Hard

Sequester Hitting Scientists Hard

By | September 4, 2013

A recent survey of working researchers highlights funding difficulties and the perceived decline of the U.S. as a leader in science. 

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