The Scientist

» thermophiles

Most Recent

image: Engineered Microbe Could Ease Switch to Grass

Engineered Microbe Could Ease Switch to Grass

By | June 2, 2014

Researchers modify a heat-loving bacterium so it can produce biofuel from switchgrass directly, with no need for costly chemical and enzymatic treatments.

1 Comment

image: Golden Goose Awards Given Again

Golden Goose Awards Given Again

By | September 12, 2013

Researchers behind high-impact studies that at first seemed obscure are honored in another round of prizes.

0 Comments

image: Microbial Fuel Factories

Microbial Fuel Factories

By | September 1, 2013

An archaeon takes the first steps toward making a liquid fuel from carbon dioxide and hydrogen gas.

2 Comments

image: Antarctic Lake Teems With Life

Antarctic Lake Teems With Life

By | July 8, 2013

DNA and RNA sequences from Lake Vostok below the Antarctic glacier reveal thousands of bacteria species, including some commonly found in fish digestive systems.

1 Comment

image: Distantly Related Viruses Proliferate Similarly

Distantly Related Viruses Proliferate Similarly

By | June 12, 2013

Whether infecting hot spring-dwelling microbes or humans, viruses co-opt the same group of proteins to assemble themselves and break out of cells.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe
    Daily News UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe

    The European Patent Office will grant patent rights over the use of CRISPR in all cell types to a University of California team, contrasting with a recent decision in the U.S.

  2. DNA Replication Errors Contribute to Cancer Risk
  3. Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?
    Daily News Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?

    With its announced launch of a whole-exome sequencing service for apparently healthy individuals, Ambry Genetics is the latest company to enter this growing market. But whether these services are useful for most people remains up for debate.  

  4. Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target
    Daily News Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target

    The results of a CRISPR-Cas9 study suggest that MELK—a protein thought to play a critical role in cancer—is not necessary for cancer cell survival.

Business Birmingham