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Scientific Literacy Redefined

By | February 1, 2016

Researchers could become better at engaging in public discourse by more fully considering the social and cultural contexts of their work.

9 Comments

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Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2016

February 2016's selection of notable quotes

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Epigenetics of Obesity

By | January 29, 2016

Differential expression of a chromatin-interacting protein is linked to weight variation in mice and humans, researchers show.

2 Comments

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AAUP Champion Dies

By | January 26, 2016

Jordan Kurland, associate general secretary of the American Association of University Professors, has passed away at age 87. 

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Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2016

January 2016's selection of notable quotes

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RNA Epigenetics

By , , and | January 1, 2016

DNA isn’t the only decorated nucleic acid in the cell. Modifications to RNA molecules are much more common and are critical for regulating diverse biological processes.

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RNA Methylation Dynamics

By , , and | January 1, 2016

Additions to the bases of RNA molecules can be written, read, and erased.

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Speaking of Science 2015

By | December 31, 2015

A year’s worth of noteworthy quotes

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Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2015

Welcome to the Microbiome, The Paradox of Evolution, Newton's Apple, and Dawn of the Neuron.

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Self Correction

By | December 1, 2015

What to do when you realize your publication is fatally flawed

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