The Scientist

» chimpanzee, microbiology and culture

Most Recent

In Chapter 3, “From Mating to Conception,” author Robert Martin explores the question of why humans and other primates frequently engage in sexual intercourse when females are not fertile.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2013

Denial, Probably Approximately Correct, Permanent Present Tense, and Against Their Will

0 Comments

image: Widening the Fertile Window

Widening the Fertile Window

By | July 1, 2013

Women may be able to store viable sperm for longer than a week, thus contributing to apparent variability in pregnancy lengths.

1 Comment

image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.

7 Comments

image: Image of the Day: <em>E. coli</em> Hunter

Image of the Day: E. coli Hunter

By | June 27, 2013

The Shiga toxin may help E. coli survive predation by the protist Tetrahymena.

0 Comments

image: NIH to Cut Back on Chimp Research

NIH to Cut Back on Chimp Research

By | June 26, 2013

The NIH will significantly reduce the use of chimpanzees in biomedical research and retire the majority of its chimps to sanctuaries.

1 Comment

image: The Art of Science

The Art of Science

By | June 21, 2013

Princeton scientists and engineers create a stunning collection of scientific images better suited for a gallery than a lab meeting.

2 Comments

image: US Chimps May Get Endangered Status

US Chimps May Get Endangered Status

By | June 13, 2013

A proposal to grant captive chimpanzees the same endangered species status as wild chimps could hamper medical research.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Going International

Opinion: Going International

By and | June 10, 2013

US universities need to reach across their own borders to retain global scientific preeminence.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: The Dilemma of Diversity

Opinion: The Dilemma of Diversity

By | June 10, 2013

The NIH remains a Caucasian-dominated workforce. Why haven’t the agency’s efforts to diversify been successful?

3 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Gut Microbes Linked to Neurodegenerative Disease
  2. Opinion: WHO’s Silence on Cannabis
  3. Top 10 Innovations 2016
    Features Top 10 Innovations 2016

    This year’s list of winners celebrates both large leaps and small (but important) steps in life science technology.

  4. Infant Microbiome: Vaginal Delivery Versus C-Section
Rockland