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image: Chimp Viruses for Human Vaccines

Chimp Viruses for Human Vaccines

By | January 4, 2012

An adenovirus isolated from chimpanzee feces proves more effective than human adenoviruses as a vaccine vector for hepatitis C.

4 Comments

image: Blot Figure Fraud

Blot Figure Fraud

By | January 4, 2012

A SUNY graduate student falsifies Western blot data used in meetings, grant applications, and submitted manuscripts

9 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | January 4, 2012

A roundup of recent discoveries in behavior research

0 Comments

image: Another Chronic Fatigue Study Retracted

Another Chronic Fatigue Study Retracted

By | January 3, 2012

After Science pulls the original article linking a mouse virus to the chronic fatigue syndrome, PNAS follows suit, yanking the only other study supporting the link.

0 Comments

image: Top Ten Innovations 2011

Top Ten Innovations 2011

By | January 1, 2012

Our list of the best and brightest products that 2011 had to offer the life scientist

5 Comments

image: It’s Easy Being Green

It’s Easy Being Green

By | January 1, 2012

Now RNA can glow in the cell, as only proteins could in the past.

0 Comments

image: Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

By | January 1, 2012

Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Western Ontario. Age: 34

3 Comments

image: Motor Lock

Motor Lock

By | January 1, 2012

Editor’s choice in structural biology

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image: Pits Stopped

Pits Stopped

By | January 1, 2012

Editor’s choice in cell biology

0 Comments

image: 2011's Best and Brightest

2011's Best and Brightest

By | January 1, 2012

In its brief, 4-year history, The Scientist’s annual Top 10 Innovations contest has become a showcase of the coolest life science tools to emerge in the previous year. 

15 Comments

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