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image: Sloppy Notes Led to Goodall Plagiarism

Sloppy Notes Led to Goodall Plagiarism

By | April 1, 2014

Jane Goodall’s latest book was revised to eliminate plagiarism, which she blames on chaotic note-taking.  

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image: Dermatologically Derived

Dermatologically Derived

By | April 1, 2014

Inspired by turkey skin, researchers devise a bacteriophage-based sensor whose color changes upon binding specific molecules.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | April 1, 2014

April 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | March 27, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Gut Microbes Gobble Cocoa

Gut Microbes Gobble Cocoa

By | March 19, 2014

Commensal bacteria that populate the human gastrointestinal tract help digest dark chocolate, releasing anti-inflammatory compounds, researchers report.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | March 12, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Week in Review: March 3–7

Week in Review: March 3–7

By | March 7, 2014

The gene behind a butterfly’s mimicry; the evolution of adipose fins; bacteria and bowel cancer; plants lacking plastid genomes

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image: Convergent Fish Fins

Convergent Fish Fins

By | March 5, 2014

Adipose fins, long considered vestigial, may have evolved multiple times as a key adaptation in some fish, study finds.

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image: Flashy Deep Sea Fish

Flashy Deep Sea Fish

By | March 5, 2014

Fish with complex light-emitting photophore patterns may be primed to split into new species.

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image: Bacteria’s Role in Bowel Cancer

Bacteria’s Role in Bowel Cancer

By | March 3, 2014

The development of serrated polyps depends on bacteria present in the gut, a mouse study shows.  

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