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image: Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

By | July 1, 2013

Paul Ehrlich came up with an explanation for cellular interactions based on receptors, earning a Nobel Prize and the title "Father of Modern Immunology"—only to have his theory forgotten.

3 Comments

image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity

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image: Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

By | June 16, 2013

The cell fragments play a role in the body’s first line of defense against bacterial infection, helping white blood cells grab blood-borne bacteria in the liver.

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Malaria parasites transmitted via mosquitoes elicit a more effective immune response and cause less severe infection than those directly injected into red blood cells.

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image: Week in Review, May 20–24

Week in Review, May 20–24

By | May 24, 2013

Journals plagiarizing journals; new immune cells combat diabetes; TB-killing vitamin C; analog cell computers; real time fish memory; ant-pitcher plant mutualism

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image: Recycling Kidneys

Recycling Kidneys

By | May 23, 2013

Researchers are trying to use discarded donor kidneys as a scaffold for building new ones.

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image: Macrophages Drive Regeneration

Macrophages Drive Regeneration

By | May 22, 2013

The activity of one type of immune cell helps regrow the limbs of amputated salamanders.

3 Comments

image: New Guardians Against Diabetes?

New Guardians Against Diabetes?

By | May 20, 2013

A new class of immune cell could protect against type 1 diabetes by suppressing other immune cells.

1 Comment

image: Toddler Gets Synthetic Windpipe

Toddler Gets Synthetic Windpipe

By | May 1, 2013

Doctors culture a custom-made trachea from plastic fibers and human cells, and successfully implant it into a child who was born without the organ.

2 Comments

image: Gregory Sonnenberg: Cellular Spy

Gregory Sonnenberg: Cellular Spy

By | May 1, 2013

Research Associate, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. Age: 27

1 Comment

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