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image: Resignations Over AIDS Denial

Resignations Over AIDS Denial

By | January 31, 2012

A member of an Italian journal’s editorial board resigns in protest of a paper denying the link between HIV and AIDs.

3 Comments

image: Saliva Legit for HIV Testing

Saliva Legit for HIV Testing

By | January 25, 2012

A quick spit test is as good as blood for detecting HIV, and could encourage self-testing initiatives in the US and Africa.

3 Comments

image: Arsenic-based Life Challenged Again

Arsenic-based Life Challenged Again

By | January 24, 2012

An attempt to regrow the infamous GFAJ-1 bacteria, reported to incorporate arsenic into its DNA backbone, has failed.

9 Comments

image: The Risks of Dangerous Research

The Risks of Dangerous Research

By | January 13, 2012

Should research that makes pathogens more deadly or infectious—or other dangerous research—be conducted in the first place?

69 Comments

image: Top Ten Innovations 2011

Top Ten Innovations 2011

By | January 1, 2012

Our list of the best and brightest products that 2011 had to offer the life scientist

5 Comments

image: Pits Stopped

Pits Stopped

By | January 1, 2012

Editor’s choice in cell biology

0 Comments

image: HIV Study Named Year's Best

HIV Study Named Year's Best

By | December 23, 2011

Science taps a clinical trial that showed the benefits of antiretroviral treatment in HIV patients as 2011's breakthrough of the year.

3 Comments

image: Semen Protein Boosts HIV Transmission

Semen Protein Boosts HIV Transmission

By | December 14, 2011

Researchers identify a protein in semen that enhances the transmission of HIV in culture, but whether it increases infectivity in humans is not yet known.

3 Comments

image: Arsenic Bug's Genome Sequenced

Arsenic Bug's Genome Sequenced

By | December 7, 2011

Researchers have mapped out the DNA of what some scientists claim to be an arsenic loving bacterium.

0 Comments

image: Stem Cells Traced To Heart

Stem Cells Traced To Heart

By | December 1, 2011

New research suggests that a controversial class of stem cells originates in the heart and retains some ability to repair damaged tissue.

3 Comments

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