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image: USB Stick Rapidly Detects HIV

USB Stick Rapidly Detects HIV

By | November 15, 2016

The prototype blood test could eventually be used to diagnose infections in resource-poor regions.

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image: Five Oncoviruses Debut On NIH Carcinogen List

Five Oncoviruses Debut On NIH Carcinogen List

By | November 7, 2016

Seven newly evaluated substances, including five oncoviruses, have been added to the US National Institutes of Health’s 14th Report on Carcinogens.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Nosing Around

Nosing Around

By | November 1, 2016

Covering neuroscience research means choosing from an embarrassment of riches.

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image: Viruses of the Human Body

Viruses of the Human Body

By | November 1, 2016

Some of our resident viruses may be beneficial.

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image: Immune System Maintains Brain Health

Immune System Maintains Brain Health

By | November 1, 2016

Once thought only to attack neurons, immune cells turn out to be vital for central nervous system function.

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image: Immunity in the Brain

Immunity in the Brain

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers document the diverse roles of immune cells in neuronal health and disease.

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image: Week in Review: October 24–28

Week in Review: October 24–28

By | October 27, 2016

Patient Zero exonerated; Jack Woodall dies; Wolbachia-harboring mosquitoes deployed in fight against Zika; implanted neurons function in adult mouse brain 

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Whole-genome sequencing of preserved blood samples provides the clearest picture to date of the virus’s arrival and spread in the U.S.

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image: Culprit for Antibody Blockade Identified

Culprit for Antibody Blockade Identified

By | October 21, 2016

Type I interferon organizes several immune mechanisms to suppress B cell responses to a chronic viral infection.

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