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image: Antibody Shows Promise For Combatting Diverse Strains Of HIV

Antibody Shows Promise For Combatting Diverse Strains Of HIV

By | November 18, 2016

In preclinical trials, the N6 antibody neutralized 98 percent of 181 HIV strains tested.

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image: USB Stick Rapidly Detects HIV

USB Stick Rapidly Detects HIV

By | November 15, 2016

The prototype blood test could eventually be used to diagnose infections in resource-poor regions.

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image: Evolution May Have Deleted Neanderthal DNA

Evolution May Have Deleted Neanderthal DNA

By | November 9, 2016

Natural selection may be behind the dearth of Neanderthal DNA in modern humans.

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image: Five Oncoviruses Debut On NIH Carcinogen List

Five Oncoviruses Debut On NIH Carcinogen List

By | November 7, 2016

Seven newly evaluated substances, including five oncoviruses, have been added to the US National Institutes of Health’s 14th Report on Carcinogens.

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image: Ebola Evolved to Become More Infectious

Ebola Evolved to Become More Infectious

By | November 7, 2016

A mutation that appeared early in the 2014 outbreak made the virus more infectious in humans, scientists show.

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Results from experiments in mice revise a long-held hypothesis that certain protein scaffolds are needed for synaptic activity.

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image: Protein Folding Pioneer Dies

Protein Folding Pioneer Dies

By | October 28, 2016

Susan Lindquist of MIT and the Whitehead Institute broke scientific ground on prions and heat shock proteins.

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The ribosome-associated organelle consists of tightly packed tubes, not flat sheets as previously believed, according to new super-resolution microscopy images.

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image: Week in Review: October 24–28

Week in Review: October 24–28

By | October 27, 2016

Patient Zero exonerated; Jack Woodall dies; Wolbachia-harboring mosquitoes deployed in fight against Zika; implanted neurons function in adult mouse brain 

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Whole-genome sequencing of preserved blood samples provides the clearest picture to date of the virus’s arrival and spread in the U.S.

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