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The Scientist

» HIV and cell & molecular biology

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image: Week in Review: April 1-5

Week in Review: April 1-5

By | April 5, 2013

Living fossils not so fossilized; Canadian gov’t threatens scientists’ freedom to speak and publish; gene therapy for sensory disorders; an unusual theory of cancer; clues for an HIV vaccine

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image: Cancer Growth Curtailed

Cancer Growth Curtailed

By | April 4, 2013

Researchers develop two small molecules that slow the growth of human cancer cells.

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image: Roadmap to an HIV Vaccine

Roadmap to an HIV Vaccine

By | April 3, 2013

Researchers track the evolution of HIV in a single patient to understand what drives the production of broadly neutralizing antibodies.

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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 1, 2013

Satellites of the Golgi apparatus generate the microtubules used to grow outer dendrite branches in Drosophila neurons.

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image: Mighty Modifications

Mighty Modifications

By | April 1, 2013

Histone acetylation levels keep intracellular pH in check.

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image: HIV Remission for 14 Patients

HIV Remission for 14 Patients

By | March 16, 2013

The virus was largely stomped out in adults who started treatment soon after infection.

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image: Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

By | March 12, 2013

Nanoparticles coated with a toxin found in bee venom can destroy HIV while leaving surrounding cells intact.

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image: Mississippi Infant Cured of HIV?

Mississippi Infant Cured of HIV?

By | March 5, 2013

Anti-retroviral therapy administered soon after birth appears to have rid the infected child of the virus.

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image: Prion-like Proteins Cause Disease

Prion-like Proteins Cause Disease

By | March 3, 2013

Normal proteins with regions resembling disease-causing prions are responsible for an inherited disorder that affects the brain, muscle, and bone.

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image: Antibiotic Bouncer

Antibiotic Bouncer

By | March 1, 2013

Contrary to previous assumptions that macrolide antibiotics completely block the exit tunnel of ribosomes, new evidence shows that some peptides are allowed to pass.

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