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image: Week in Review, July 8–12

Week in Review, July 8–12

By | July 12, 2013

Editor accused of fraud leaves post; the good and the bad of gut microbiota; bacterial gene shuffle; legal restrictions hamper illicit drug research; antibodies and autism

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image: Gene Therapy Coming of Age?

Gene Therapy Coming of Age?

By | July 11, 2013

Using lentiviral vectors to replace mutated genes in blood stem cells, scientists successfully treat two rare diseases apparently without causing harmful side effects.

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image: Gut Microbes Exacerbate HIV?

Gut Microbes Exacerbate HIV?

By | July 10, 2013

Particular microbes in the colons of HIV patients may worsen disease progression.

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image: Two Patients Rid of HIV?

Two Patients Rid of HIV?

By | July 3, 2013

Bone marrow transplants appear to have eliminated HIV from Boston cancer patients.

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image: The Downside of Antibiotics?

The Downside of Antibiotics?

By | July 3, 2013

Bacteria-killing antibiotics might also damage a person’s tissues.

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image: Temperature-Sensing Fat Cells

Temperature-Sensing Fat Cells

By | July 1, 2013

Researchers discover that unlike brown fat cells, white fat cells can directly sense cooling temperatures to switch on genes that control heat production.

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image: Master of Fate

Master of Fate

By | July 1, 2013

While tracing the tricky and sometimes surprising paths of multipotent cells in the skin, mammary gland, and heart, Cédric Blanpain has repeatedly turned the stem cell field on its head.  

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image: Cure for HIV-Infected Newborns?

Cure for HIV-Infected Newborns?

By | June 27, 2013

A clinical trial will test the strategy a Mississippi doctor used to cure an infant.

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image: Father of Crystallography Dies

Father of Crystallography Dies

By | June 17, 2013

Nobel Laureate Jerome Karle has passed away at age 94.

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image: Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

By | June 16, 2013

The cell fragments play a role in the body’s first line of defense against bacterial infection, helping white blood cells grab blood-borne bacteria in the liver.

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