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» HIV and developmental biology

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image: Inflammation Overdrive

Inflammation Overdrive

By | January 15, 2015

Experimental vaccines that specifically boost T helper cells lead to immunopathology and death in mice.

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image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

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image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

3 Comments

image: All Systems Go

All Systems Go

By | December 1, 2014

Alan Aderem earned his PhD while under house arrest for protesting apartheid in South Africa. His early political involvement has guided his scientific focus, encouraging fellow systems biologists to study immunology and infectious diseases.

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image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

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image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

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image: Urban Hub Aided Early HIV Spread

Urban Hub Aided Early HIV Spread

By | October 6, 2014

The AIDS pandemic probably began in the central African city of Kinshasa in the 1920s, a study shows.

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Like the Mississippi child that was thought to have beaten HIV after aggressive anti-retroviral treatment, detectable levels of the virus return in an Italian child who received similar therapy.

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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

3 Comments

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