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» HIV and developmental biology

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image: Meiosis Maven

Meiosis Maven

By | February 1, 2014

Fueled by her love of visual data and addicted to chromosomes, Abby Dernburg continues to study how homologous chromosomes find each other during gamete formation.

1 Comment

image: Unmasking Secret Identities

Unmasking Secret Identities

By | February 1, 2014

A tour of techniques for measuring DNA hydroxymethylation

2 Comments

image: Fish of Many Colors

Fish of Many Colors

By | January 23, 2014

Researchers seek insight into the pigmentation patterns of guppies and zebrafish.

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image: Toxin Wipes Out Persistent HIV

Toxin Wipes Out Persistent HIV

By | January 10, 2014

An antibody-toxin combo kills residual HIV hiding out in the organs of mice.

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image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue

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image: Week in Review: December 16–20

Week in Review: December 16–20

By | December 20, 2013

Sex lives of early hominins; Amborella trichopoda genome; surface topography and stem cells; how HIV weakens immune cells; dogs, dust microbes, and mouse allergies; news from ASCB

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image: How HIV Destroys Immune Cells

How HIV Destroys Immune Cells

By | December 19, 2013

During HIV infection, CD4 T cells in lymphoid tissues initiate a highly inflammatory form of cell death that helps cripple the immune system.  

1 Comment

image: HIV Returns in Patients Thought Cured

HIV Returns in Patients Thought Cured

By | December 10, 2013

The virus is back in two patients in Boston who received bone-marrow transplants and did not have detectable levels of virus for months.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: November 18–22

Week in Review: November 18–22

By | November 22, 2013

Chilly mice develop more tumors; gut bacteria aid cancer treatment; two Y chromosome genes sufficient for assisted reproduction; HIV’s “invisibility cloak”

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image: HIV’s Stealth Revealed

HIV’s Stealth Revealed

By | November 21, 2013

HIV-1 evades the immune system with a protein shield, which can be lifted.

2 Comments

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