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image: HIV Returns in Patients Thought Cured

HIV Returns in Patients Thought Cured

By | December 10, 2013

The virus is back in two patients in Boston who received bone-marrow transplants and did not have detectable levels of virus for months.

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image: Week in Review: November 18–22

Week in Review: November 18–22

By | November 22, 2013

Chilly mice develop more tumors; gut bacteria aid cancer treatment; two Y chromosome genes sufficient for assisted reproduction; HIV’s “invisibility cloak”

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image: HIV’s Stealth Revealed

HIV’s Stealth Revealed

By | November 21, 2013

HIV-1 evades the immune system with a protein shield, which can be lifted.

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image: HIV Structural Studies Undermine Prior Work

HIV Structural Studies Undermine Prior Work

By | November 4, 2013

New research on the structure of the surface protein the virus uses to infiltrate human cells clashes with an earlier paper’s findings, causing some scientists to call for a retraction.

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image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: Measuring Latent HIV

Measuring Latent HIV

By | October 24, 2013

The latent HIV provirus reservoir persisting in CD4+ T cells is potentially 60 times larger than previously believed, researchers show.

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image: SIV Vaccine Success

SIV Vaccine Success

By | September 13, 2013

A cytomegalovirus-based vaccine eliminated simian immunodeficiency virus from rhesus macaques, raising hopes of a similarly effective HIV vaccine.

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image: Portrait of an HIV Conspirator

Portrait of an HIV Conspirator

By | September 12, 2013

The three-dimensional structure of CCR5, a protein which HIV uses to infect humans' cells, could lead to better anti-HIV drugs.

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image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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