The Scientist

» HIV and developmental biology

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image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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image: Two-Faced Proteins May Tackle HIV Reservoirs

Two-Faced Proteins May Tackle HIV Reservoirs

By | October 21, 2015

Researchers design antibody-like proteins to awaken and destroy HIV holdouts.

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image: Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

By | October 13, 2015

An upcoming clinical trial aims to correct for a disease of fragile bones in affected babies before they are born.

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image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.

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image: New Way to Edit Genes

New Way to Edit Genes

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers develop a more-efficient method for rewriting DNA that could hold therapeutic value for HIV and other diseases.

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image: Sex on the Brain

Sex on the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Masculinization of the developing rodent brain leads to significant structural differences between the two sexes.

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image: Sex Differences in the Brain

Sex Differences in the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

How male and female brains diverge is a hotly debated topic, but the study of model organisms points to differences that cannot be ignored.

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image: Immunologist, AIDS Research Advocate Dies

Immunologist, AIDS Research Advocate Dies

By | September 24, 2015

William Paul, the National Institutes of Health’s Laboratory of Immunology chief, passed away at age 79.

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image: Immune Cells Can Deliver Deadly Packages

Immune Cells Can Deliver Deadly Packages

By | September 8, 2015

Much of the CD4+ T-cell death that occurs during HIV infection may be caused by direct delivery of the virus from neighboring cells, a study shows.

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image: Whaling Specimens, 1930s

Whaling Specimens, 1930s

By | September 1, 2015

Fetal specimens collected by commercial whalers offer insights into how whales may have evolved their specialized hearing organs.

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