The Scientist

» HIV and ecology

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image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: Attacking AIDS on Many Fronts

Attacking AIDS on Many Fronts

By | May 1, 2015

A close cooperation between science, politics, and economics has helped to control one of history’s most destructive epidemics.  

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image: Berlin Activist

Berlin Activist

By | May 1, 2015

Timothy Ray Brown, the first and only patient to ever be cured of AIDS, is bringing his message of hope to the search for a more widespread solution to the AIDS epidemic.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2015

The Genealogy of a Gene, On the Move, The Chimp and the River, and Domesticated

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | May 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Filippos Porichis: Immunoregulator

Filippos Porichis: Immunoregulator

By | May 1, 2015

Principal Investigator, Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard. Age: 33

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image: Hidden Menace

Hidden Menace

By , , and | May 1, 2015

Curing HIV means finding and eradicating viruses still lurking in the shadows.

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image: Hiding in the Haystack

Hiding in the Haystack

By | May 1, 2015

Encouraging developments in HIV research

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image: HIV in the Internet Age

HIV in the Internet Age

By | May 1, 2015

Social networking sites may facilitate the spread of sexually transmitted disease, but these sites also serve as effective education and prevention tools.

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image: Llamas as Lab Rats

Llamas as Lab Rats

By | May 1, 2015

From diagnostics to vaccines, llama antibodies point to new directions in HIV research.

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