Advertisement

The Scientist

» inflammation and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Time for T cells

Time for T cells

By | November 7, 2013

Circadian rhythms control the development of inflammatory T cells, while jet lag sends their production into overdrive.

1 Comment

image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

0 Comments

image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

0 Comments

image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

0 Comments

image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

17 Comments

image: STW: In the Field

STW: In the Field

By | August 1, 2013

Scientist to Watch Josh Snodgrass has traveled the world, from Siberia to South America, to study how the physiology of indigenous peoples shifts with changing lifestyles.

0 Comments

image: Josh Snodgrass: An Adaptive Mind

Josh Snodgrass: An Adaptive Mind

By | August 1, 2013

Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon. Age: 41

0 Comments

image: Gut Microbes Exacerbate HIV?

Gut Microbes Exacerbate HIV?

By | July 10, 2013

Particular microbes in the colons of HIV patients may worsen disease progression.

1 Comment

image: Gut Microbes Treat Illness

Gut Microbes Treat Illness

By | July 10, 2013

Oral administration of a cocktail of bacteria derived from the human gut reduces colitis and allergy-invoked diarrhea in mice.

0 Comments

image: New Viruses Attack Asia and Africa

New Viruses Attack Asia and Africa

By | June 24, 2013

A poorly studied family of viruses with circular genomes may be behind cases of brain inflammation in Vietnam and paraplegia in Malawi.

0 Comments

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. Most Earth-like Planet Found
  2. AAAAA Is for Arrested Translation
  3. Four-legged Snake Fossil Found
  4. The Sum of Our Parts
    Features The Sum of Our Parts

    Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.

Advertisement
Cell Sciences
Cell Sciences
Advertisement