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» inflammation and developmental biology

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image: Muscle to Mind

Muscle to Mind

By | September 25, 2014

Exercise-induced muscle metabolites protect the brain from stress-induced depression in a mouse model. 

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

3 Comments

image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Inflammation Data Clash

Inflammation Data Clash

By | August 7, 2014

Identical datasets yield opposite conclusions on the use of mice as models of human inflammation.

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

1 Comment

image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

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image: Week in Review: May 19–23

Week in Review: May 19–23

By | May 23, 2014

Sperm-sex–sensing sows; blocking a pain receptor extends lifespan in mice; stop codons can code for amino acids; exploring the tumor exome

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image: No Pain, Big Gain

No Pain, Big Gain

By | May 22, 2014

Eliminating a pain receptor makes mice live longer and keeps their metabolisms young.

3 Comments

image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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