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image: Finding Injury

Finding Injury

By | September 1, 2012

The brain’s phagocytes follow an ATP bread trail laid down by calcium waves to the site of damage.

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image: Ubiquitin Chains in Action

Ubiquitin Chains in Action

By | July 1, 2012

Present in every tissue of the body, ubiquitin appears to be involved in a dizzying array of functions, from cell cycle and division to organelle and ribosome biogenesis, as well as the response to viral infection. The protein plays at least two role

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image: Link to Second Heart Attack Uncovered

Link to Second Heart Attack Uncovered

By | June 27, 2012

Researchers elucidate how a first heart attack sets the stage for later heart trouble by boosting inflammatory cell development.

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image: The Aging and Inflammation Link

The Aging and Inflammation Link

By | May 24, 2012

A protein that keeps the immune response in check leads a double life as an anti-aging factor.

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image: Tumor Turnabout

Tumor Turnabout

By | May 1, 2012

A cytokine involved in suppressing the immune system may actually activate it to kill cancer cells.

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image: News from Cancer Meeting

News from Cancer Meeting

By | April 4, 2012

A roundup of recent research announced this week at the annual conference of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR).

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image: Designer Aspirin Fights Cancer

Designer Aspirin Fights Cancer

By | March 5, 2012

Early experiments show that a hybrid form of the common pain reliever can effectively inhibit the growth of many tumor types.

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image: Resolving Chronic Pain

Resolving Chronic Pain

By | January 1, 2012

The body’s own mechanism for dispersing the inflammatory reaction might lead to new treatments for chronic pain.

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Contributors

January 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Inflammation, Pain, and Resolvins

Inflammation, Pain, and Resolvins

By | January 1, 2012

Not all inflammation leads to pain. Despite widespread infection followed by fever, colds rarely cause pain. But when some cytokines and certain immune cells are active near pain-sensing nerves, they trigger receptors that convey pain sensations to the brain.

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