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image: Golden Goose Awards Given Again

Golden Goose Awards Given Again

By | September 12, 2013

Researchers behind high-impact studies that at first seemed obscure are honored in another round of prizes.

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image: Green OA Is Golden

Green OA Is Golden

By | September 10, 2013

A new report lauds the UK government’s commitment to open access, but calls its early devotion to the gold model a “mistake.”

2 Comments

image: Obesity via Microbe Transplants

Obesity via Microbe Transplants

By | September 5, 2013

Germ-free mice gain weight when transplanted with gut microbes from obese humans, in a diet-dependent manner.

7 Comments

image: Decoding Drug-Resistant TB

Decoding Drug-Resistant TB

By | September 1, 2013

Researchers characterize drug-resistant tuberculosis by analyzing the genomes of more than 500 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from around the world.

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image: Data Sharing Goes Linux

Data Sharing Goes Linux

By | August 27, 2013

A life-science information platform joins the nonprofit organization that helped develop the open-source operating system.

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image: Eat Less and Live Longer?

Eat Less and Live Longer?

By | August 13, 2013

Mice on a low-calorie diet harbor a distinct population of gut microorganisms that helps prolong life.

4 Comments

image: UC Embraces Open Access

UC Embraces Open Access

By | August 5, 2013

The University of California has adopted a system-wide policy that aims to make future research articles authored by its faculty freely available to all.

1 Comment

image: Preserving Research

Preserving Research

By | August 1, 2013

The top online archives for storing your unpublished findings

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image: Week in Review, July 15–19

Week in Review, July 15–19

By | July 19, 2013

Bias in preclinical research; medical marijuana for kids; a swath of microbial genomes; plastic ocean habitats; rethinking scientific evaluation

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image: Microbial Diversity

Microbial Diversity

By | July 14, 2013

By sequencing bacterial and archaeal genomes from single cells, scientists have filled in many uncharted branches of the tree of life.

2 Comments

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