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These institutions join around 60 others that hope to put increasing pressure on the publishing giant in ongoing negotiations for a new nationwide licensing agreement.

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image: On Blacklists and Whitelists

On Blacklists and Whitelists

By | July 17, 2017

Experts debate how best to point researchers to reputable publishers and steer them away from predatory ones.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

 Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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image: Identifying Predatory Publishers

Identifying Predatory Publishers

By | July 17, 2017

How to tell reputable journals from shady ones

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image: Authors Peeved by APA’s Article Takedown Pilot

Authors Peeved by APA’s Article Takedown Pilot

By | June 15, 2017

In an effort to crack down on unauthorized postings of journal articles, the American Psychological Association is policing the Internet for scientists sharing their own work. 

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image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

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image: Making Public Data Public

Making Public Data Public

By | June 8, 2017

Computational scientists develop a system for spotting data overdue for public release, and end up getting hundreds of open-access datasets corrected.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

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The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

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