The Scientist

» open access and culture

Most Recent

By ditching traditional agar-based media, two biochemists captured iconic images of Myxococcus in 1982.

0 Comments

image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | August 1, 2016

Brexit's effect on science, melding disciplines, and more

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Two Steps Toward Establishing Priority of Discovery

Opinion: Two Steps Toward Establishing Priority of Discovery

By | July 19, 2016

Establishing priority of a new finding is best achieved through a combination of a rapid, scientist-controlled disclosure followed by subsequent validation, through journal-based peer review and other mechanisms.

1 Comment

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Blood Sugar</em>

Book Excerpt from Blood Sugar

By | July 1, 2016

Author Anthony Ryan Hatch relays his personal experience with metabolic syndrome.

1 Comment

image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

0 Comments

image: Metabolic Syndrome, Research, and Race

Metabolic Syndrome, Research, and Race

By | July 1, 2016

Scientists who study the lifestyle disorder must do a better job of incorporating political and social science into their work.

1 Comment

image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | July 1, 2016

Human Genome Project-Write; viruses are alpha predators; Zika and the Olympics

1 Comment

Ancient DNA research suggests that there were two independent agricultural revolutions more than 10,000 years ago.

1 Comment

image: Breathing Life Into Papers

Breathing Life Into Papers

By | June 12, 2016

Researchers prepare to launch an effort to make the scientific literature more dynamic.

0 Comments

image: E.U. Pushes for Open Access by 2020

E.U. Pushes for Open Access by 2020

By | June 1, 2016

European Union member states agree to an ambitious goal to make all scientific papers freely accessible within four years.

3 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Optimism for Key Deer After Hurricane Irma
  2. Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?
  3. Decoding the Tripping Brain
  4. Tattoo Ink Nanoparticles Persist in Lymph Nodes
    The Nutshell Tattoo Ink Nanoparticles Persist in Lymph Nodes

    Analysis of the bodies of deceased individuals can’t determine what effect these tattoo remnants have on lymph function, but researchers suggest dirty needles aren’t the only risk of the age-old practice.

AAAS