The Scientist

» open access and developmental biology

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image: Mass Retraction

Mass Retraction

By | March 27, 2015

BioMed Central retracts 43 papers it had been investigating for evidence of faked peer review.

1 Comment

image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Truly Brief Communications

Truly Brief Communications

By | February 18, 2015

The Journal of Brief Ideas, a platform that publishes 200-word articles, launches in beta.

1 Comment

image: University of California Doubles Down on OA

University of California Doubles Down on OA

By | January 21, 2015

The academic institution’s press is launching two new open-access initiatives to make research results and academic manuscripts publicly available.

0 Comments

image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

7 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2015

January 2015's selection of notable quotes

2 Comments

image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

3 Comments

image: <em>Nature</em> Opens the Archives

Nature Opens the Archives

By | December 3, 2014

Users will be able to access articles dating back to 1869 from the journal and its sister titles, but cannot copy, print, or download the materials.

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image: Gates Foundation Pushes OA

Gates Foundation Pushes OA

By | November 24, 2014

The organization is mandating open access to publications resulting from research it funds.

0 Comments

image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

0 Comments

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