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image: Monkey See, Monkey Die

Monkey See, Monkey Die

By | May 1, 2016

What's killing howler monkeys in the jungles of Central America?


image: Silent Canopies

Silent Canopies

By | May 1, 2016

A spate of howler monkey deaths in Nicaragua, Panama, and Ecuador has researchers scrambling to identify the cause.


image: Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators

Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators

By | April 28, 2016

Baby fish show fewer signs of stress in the presence of large fish that scare off midsize predators. 


image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Serengeti Rules</em>

Book Excerpt from The Serengeti Rules

By | April 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Sean B. Carroll draws the parallels between ecological and physiological maladies.


image: Contributors


By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.


image: Parallel Plagues

Parallel Plagues

By | April 1, 2016

Like cancer, ecological scourges result from the breakdown of regulatory processes, and may be treated with similar logic.


image: TS Picks: March 15, 2016

TS Picks: March 15, 2016

By | March 15, 2016

Profile of a CRISPR pioneer; SciHub, open access, and for-profit publishing; improving ecological models


A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.


image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | February 16, 2016

Uptick in Guillain-Barré syndrome; Zika data-sharing snags; Brazilian state discontinues larvicide

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

1 Comment

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