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image: One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

By | October 6, 2015

A global assessment of declining cacti populations places responsibility on increasing human activities.

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image: “WikiGate” Ruffles OA Feathers

“WikiGate” Ruffles OA Feathers

By | September 16, 2015

A partnership between Wikipedia and scholarly publishing behemoth Elsevier has open-access advocates up in arms.

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image: Using FOIA to Read Scientists’ Emails

Using FOIA to Read Scientists’ Emails

By | September 8, 2015

Journalists and activists use the Freedom of Information Act to expose academics’ relationships with industry.

2 Comments

image: New Journal Opens Research Process

New Journal Opens Research Process

By | September 3, 2015

An open-access journal that will publish research ideas, methods, workflows, and software has launched.

1 Comment

image: Butterflies in Peril

Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.

5 Comments

image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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image: 1 + 1 = 1

1 + 1 = 1

By | July 1, 2015

Nutrient levels in soil don’t add up when food chains combine.

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image: Intelligence Gathering

Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century

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image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.

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image: EMBL Goes OA

EMBL Goes OA

By | June 17, 2015

Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory must now publish their work in an open-access database.

0 Comments

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