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image: TS Picks: March 15, 2016

TS Picks: March 15, 2016

By | March 15, 2016

Profile of a CRISPR pioneer; SciHub, open access, and for-profit publishing; improving ecological models

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A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | February 16, 2016

Uptick in Guillain-Barré syndrome; Zika data-sharing snags; Brazilian state discontinues larvicide

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

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image: Keep Off the Grass

Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.

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image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37

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image: TS Picks: December 14, 2015

TS Picks: December 14, 2015

By | December 14, 2015

New PhDs boost economy; Dutch universities strike open-access deal with Elsevier; #scibucketlist

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image: Owl Be Darned

Owl Be Darned

By | December 4, 2015

Researchers studying city-dwelling birds are learning about which animals are more suited to urban life.

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image: A Rainforest Chorus

A Rainforest Chorus

By | December 1, 2015

Researchers measure the health of Papua New Guinea’s forests by analyzing the ecological soundscape.

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image: Jungle Field Trip

Jungle Field Trip

By | December 1, 2015

Travel to remote rain forests in Papua New Guinea with researchers from The Nature Conservancy who are working with native people to characterize ecosystems there using sound.

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