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image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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image: WHO: Share Trial Data

WHO: Share Trial Data

By | April 15, 2015

The World Health Organization again calls upon researchers to register clinical trial details in freely accessible databases before initiation of the study.

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image: Online Platforms to Share Medical Data Launch

Online Platforms to Share Medical Data Launch

By | April 1, 2015

The “Genes for Good” Facebook app and the Open Humans Network plan to recruit large numbers of volunteers for medical studies using social media.

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image: Mass Retraction

Mass Retraction

By | March 27, 2015

BioMed Central retracts 43 papers it had been investigating for evidence of faked peer review.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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image: Truly Brief Communications

Truly Brief Communications

By | February 18, 2015

The Journal of Brief Ideas, a platform that publishes 200-word articles, launches in beta.

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image: University of California Doubles Down on OA

University of California Doubles Down on OA

By | January 21, 2015

The academic institution’s press is launching two new open-access initiatives to make research results and academic manuscripts publicly available.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2015

January 2015's selection of notable quotes

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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