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Speaking of Science

By | July 1, 2012

July 2012's selection of notable quotes

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image: The First Australopithecus, 1925

The First Australopithecus, 1925

By | July 1, 2012

The discovery of the 2.5-million-year-old Taung Child skull marked a turning point in the study of human brain evolution.

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image: UK to Enforce Paper Sharing

UK to Enforce Paper Sharing

By | June 29, 2012

The United Kingdom's Wellcome Trust announces that it will begin sanctioning researchers who do not submit manuscripts to the public UK PubMed Central database.

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image: Five Mutations Make H5N1 Airborne

Five Mutations Make H5N1 Airborne

By | June 21, 2012

The second of the two controversial bird flu papers is published in Science, revealing that just five mutations can render the virus transmissible between ferrets.

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image: UK Gov’t Supports Open Access Plan

UK Gov’t Supports Open Access Plan

By | June 19, 2012

The UK government releases its recommendation that open access be “the main vehicle for the publication of research,” though it warns of the costs that could entail.

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image: The Publishing Buffet

The Publishing Buffet

By | June 13, 2012

An open-access journal with an all-you-can-publish fee structure announces its launch.

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image: Discovering Phasmids

Discovering Phasmids

By | June 9, 2012

Shortly after a rat infested supply ship ran around in Lord Howe Island off the east coast of Australia in 1918, the newly introduced mammals wiped out the island's phasmids—stick insects the size of a human hand. 

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image: 25,000 Sign OA Petition

25,000 Sign OA Petition

By | June 6, 2012

A petition to require researchers funded by US federal science agencies to share their results now has enough signatures to prompt a response from the White House.

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image: Finding Phasmids

Finding Phasmids

By | June 1, 2012

Researchers rediscover a giant insect, thought to have gone extinct a century ago, and plan to reintroduce it to its native island off the coast of Australia.

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image: Hacking the Genome

Hacking the Genome

By | June 1, 2012

In pondering genome structure and function, evolutionary geneticist Laurence Hurst has arrived at some unanticipated conclusions about how natural selection has molded our DNA.

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