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image: Defining Legit Open Access Journals

Defining Legit Open Access Journals

By | December 20, 2013

Scholarly publishing organizations join forces to set standards for aboveboard open access journals.  

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image: Preprints Galore

Preprints Galore

By | November 12, 2013

The research community sees the launch of a new life science–centric preprint server.

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image: Open-Access Genomes

Open-Access Genomes

By | November 8, 2013

The U.K.’s newly launched Personal Genome Project seeks volunteers.  

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image: Fake Paper Exposes Failed Peer Review

Fake Paper Exposes Failed Peer Review

By | October 6, 2013

The widespread acceptance of an atrocious manuscript, fabricated by an investigative journalist, reveals the near absence of quality at some journals.

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image: Green OA Is Golden

Green OA Is Golden

By | September 10, 2013

A new report lauds the UK government’s commitment to open access, but calls its early devotion to the gold model a “mistake.”

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image: Data Sharing Goes Linux

Data Sharing Goes Linux

By | August 27, 2013

A life-science information platform joins the nonprofit organization that helped develop the open-source operating system.

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image: UC Embraces Open Access

UC Embraces Open Access

By | August 5, 2013

The University of California has adopted a system-wide policy that aims to make future research articles authored by its faculty freely available to all.

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image: Preserving Research

Preserving Research

By | August 1, 2013

The top online archives for storing your unpublished findings

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image: OA Plan to Appease White House?

OA Plan to Appease White House?

By | June 6, 2013

Scientific publishers come up with a scheme to disseminate publicly funded research in response to a directive from President Obama’s top science advisor.

3 Comments

image: OMICS in Hot Water

OMICS in Hot Water

By | May 14, 2013

HHS tells an open-access publisher to stop using the NIH, the names of its employees, and its scientific literature databases in a “misleading manner.”

3 Comments

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