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image: Opinion: Brain Scans in the Courtroom

Opinion: Brain Scans in the Courtroom

By | November 23, 2015

Advances in neuroimaging have improved our understanding of the brain, but the resulting data do little to help judges and juries determine criminal culpability.

2 Comments

image: Catching Criminals

Catching Criminals

By | April 1, 2013

A tactic designed to nab repeat offenders also pinpoints the source of infectious diseases and invasive species.

2 Comments

image: Brain Activity Predicts Re-arrest

Brain Activity Predicts Re-arrest

By | March 27, 2013

Researchers demonstrate that brain activity in response to a decision-making challenge predicts the likelihood that released prisoners will be re-arrested.

0 Comments

image: A Call for Gun-Violence Research

A Call for Gun-Violence Research

By | January 14, 2013

More than 100 scientists signed a letter asking government to increase research on gun violence.

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image: Neuroscience Not Ready for the Courtroom

Neuroscience Not Ready for the Courtroom

By | December 14, 2011

Certain neuroscience techniques are not robust enough to be used as evidence in a trial, a new report says.

6 Comments

image: Criminal genes

Criminal genes

By | June 22, 2011

Experts come together to revisit the controversial field of genetics and criminology.

3 Comments

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