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An investigation has found the thoracic surgeon who transplanted artificial tracheae into patients not guilty of overhyping his research.

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image: How a Popular Probiotic Works

How a Popular Probiotic Works

By | April 16, 2015

Eating a type of bacterium encourages the activity of other gut microbes, according to a small study.

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image: Plant Biologist’s Work Investigated

Plant Biologist’s Work Investigated

By | April 2, 2015

Institutions where RNA interference scientist Olivier Voinnet has worked are looking into allegations of misconduct.

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image: Enzyme Improves CRISPR

Enzyme Improves CRISPR

By | April 1, 2015

A smaller Cas9 protein enables in vivo genome engineering via viral vectors.

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image: Manipulative Microbiomes

Manipulative Microbiomes

By | April 1, 2015

Gut bacteria control tumor growth via the mammalian immune system.

3 Comments

image: Soil Bacteria Live on Wine Grapes

Soil Bacteria Live on Wine Grapes

By | March 25, 2015

The earthiness of Merlot may have to do with grapevine-dwelling microbiota.

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image: Judge Wants Info on PubPeer Commenter

Judge Wants Info on PubPeer Commenter

By | March 23, 2015

In a defamation lawsuit involving anonymous comments on the post-publication peer review website, a judge requests potentially identifying information.

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image: Quorum-Sensing Molecule Modifies Gut Microbiota

Quorum-Sensing Molecule Modifies Gut Microbiota

By | March 19, 2015

Increasing the abundance of a chemical some microbes use to communicate with one another can help reinstate beneficial bacterial populations in the guts of antibiotic-treated mice. 

1 Comment

image: Sewage Bacteria Linked to Obesity

Sewage Bacteria Linked to Obesity

By | March 10, 2015

Microbes identified in a city’s sewage treatment plants correlate with the population’s obesity rate, a study shows.

1 Comment

image: Nanobombs Terminate Foodborne Microbes

Nanobombs Terminate Foodborne Microbes

By | March 5, 2015

Researchers engineer water nanostructures to wipe out pathogens that can spoil food and pose health risks.

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