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image: Nutrition Researcher Loses Libel Suit

Nutrition Researcher Loses Libel Suit

By | August 3, 2015

The Ontario Superior Court of Justice rules that the Canadian Broadcasting Company did not commit libel in its documentary series on fraud allegations against Ranjit Chandra.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | August 1, 2015

August 2015's selection of notable quotes

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image: Cognitive Decline More Swift in Women

Cognitive Decline More Swift in Women

By | July 22, 2015

Mental agility in women deteriorates at twice the rate of that in men, according to a study of people with mild cognitive impairment.

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image: Why Screams Scare Us

Why Screams Scare Us

By | July 20, 2015

Analyzing the acoustical qualities of screams and other sounds, researchers pinpoint why people find screams—and emergency vehicle sirens—frightening.

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image: Mini Brains Model Autism

Mini Brains Model Autism

By | July 16, 2015

Patient-derived organoids reveal autism spectrum disorder–associated anomalies.

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image: Mental Speedometer Cells

Mental Speedometer Cells

By | July 15, 2015

Scientists identify neurons that track speed in the brains of moving rats.

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image: Report: Plant Biologist Guilty of Misconduct

Report: Plant Biologist Guilty of Misconduct

By | July 10, 2015

Investigators find that RNAi researcher Olivier Voinnet willfully misrepresented data published in several journals.

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image: Three Monkey Brains, One Robotic Arm

Three Monkey Brains, One Robotic Arm

By | July 10, 2015

Researchers network the brains of three monkeys to create a “living computer” that can steer an image of a robotic arm toward a target.

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image: Gene Therapy Fixes Mouse Hearing

Gene Therapy Fixes Mouse Hearing

By | July 9, 2015

Expressing a gene for a component of the inner ear’s hair cells treated a form of genetic deafness.

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image: Can We Smell A Trillion Odors?

Can We Smell A Trillion Odors?

By | July 8, 2015

A reanalysis calls into question a year-old claim that humans can decipher at least 1 trillion different scents.

2 Comments

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