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image: Opinion: The Scientist’s Scarlet Letter

Opinion: The Scientist’s Scarlet Letter

By | December 16, 2016

Managing privacy protections and expectations in a misconduct proceeding

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image: Mouse Immunology Paper Retracted

Mouse Immunology Paper Retracted

By | December 16, 2016

A finding of misconduct spurs the retraction of a Science paper claiming to have identified a protein in mice that boosted immunity to both viruses and cancer.

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Lawyers involved discuss the latest twist in the ongoing litigation that pits pathologist Fazlul Sarkar against anonymous commenters on the post-publication peer review site.

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Court of Appeals denies a motion filed by ACLU lawyers to enter the full Wayne State University investigation of pathologist Fazlul Sarkar into the official case record.

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image: Retrieving Short-Term Memories

Retrieving Short-Term Memories

By | December 1, 2016

Neurons can continue to capture a short-term memory without continuous firing, researchers show.  

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Scientists are enlisting the help of pigeons, parrots, crows, jays, and other species to disprove the notion that human cognitive abilities are beyond those of other animals.

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image: Speaking of Neuroscience

Speaking of Neuroscience

By and | November 18, 2016

A selection of notable quotes from the annual Society for Neuroscience meeting

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image: Hot Topics at SfN

Hot Topics at SfN

By | November 18, 2016

Researchers at this year’s Society for Neuroscience meeting in San Diego, California, discuss what they found most interesting.

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Lawyers for PubPeer have obtained and posted the full investigation report from Wayne State University, which lists more than 140 misconduct allegations against pathologist Fazlul Sarkar.

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image: Scientists Fingerprint the Brain

Scientists Fingerprint the Brain

By | November 17, 2016

The brain’s structural connections are unique to an individual, a new imaging technique reveals.

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