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image: Body, Heal Thyself

Body, Heal Thyself

By | September 1, 2015

Reviving a decades-old hypothesis of autoimmunity

8 Comments

image: Organ Engineer Cleared of Misconduct

Organ Engineer Cleared of Misconduct

By | August 31, 2015

The Karolinska Institute has rejected the conclusions of an earlier, independent investigation, finding regenerative medicine researcher Paolo Macchiarini not guilty of scientific misconduct.

1 Comment

image: Sage Pulls More Papers for Fake Peer Review

Sage Pulls More Papers for Fake Peer Review

By | August 20, 2015

The publisher is retracting 17 articles because of tampering with the peer-review process.

1 Comment

image: Nutrition Researcher Loses Libel Suit

Nutrition Researcher Loses Libel Suit

By | August 3, 2015

The Ontario Superior Court of Justice rules that the Canadian Broadcasting Company did not commit libel in its documentary series on fraud allegations against Ranjit Chandra.

0 Comments

image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

1 Comment

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | August 1, 2015

August 2015's selection of notable quotes

5 Comments

image: The Human Touch

The Human Touch

By | August 1, 2015

Can mice with humanlike tissues better model drug effects in people?

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image: The Spleen Collectors

The Spleen Collectors

By | August 1, 2015

Donated organs are helping researchers map out the immune system in humans.

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image: Yun “Nancy” Huang: Eager for Epigenetics

Yun “Nancy” Huang: Eager for Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Institute of Biosciences and Technology, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Houston. Age: 35

0 Comments

image: NK Cell Diversity and Viral Risk

NK Cell Diversity and Viral Risk

By | July 22, 2015

A small study links the diversity of a person’s natural killer cell repertoire to risk of HIV infection following exposure to the virus.

0 Comments

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